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The Unkindness of Ravens


Ebook

Trade Paperback

OWN IT!      ABOUT IT      EXCERPT      REVIEWS      WHAT ELSE TO READ



Unkindness of Ravens cover art
OWN IT!

The Unkindness of Ravens is now available at all major ebook retailers.

Trade paperbacks are available through Amazon or Barnes & Noble, or you can order a copy from your local independent bookstore.


ABOUT IT

What's worse than being ignored by your god? Worse is having your god owe you a favor. Particularly when he's a trickster. The Unkindness of Ravens is an epic fantasy novella about trickster gods, favors owed, and a royal heir desperate to protect his House from a plague-driven war.

Cover Copy

The oba is dead. Nobody wears the beaded crown.

The Eight Great Houses are under attack ... and they are losing.

What's worse than being ignored by your god?

As the royal heir from House Crow, Anari is desperate to protect his people from a plague-driven war.

Without the blessing of his god, he doesn't have the magical power to compete in the succession battle for the crown of the oba. He is easy prey for the strongest heirs. To stay alive, he must be quick and clever.

When his plans go wrong, he does the unthinkable.

Worse is having your god owe you a favor. Particularly when he's a trickster.

Anari might not become the ruler of his people, but he has won his god's undivided attention. If he can survive what he's put in motion, he will have one chance to save them all. Fortunately, Anari has a few tricks up his own sleeve ...

Available As

Ebook ISBN-13: 978-0-9863775-4-9
Trade Paperback ISBN-13: 978-0-9863775-5-6


EXCERPT
Six years ago.

Anari escaped The Crow wing of the palace during the hottest part of the day, when most people were sleeping. His overrobe bulged in unusual places because of the knee-length quilted armor and sword hidden underneath. He assumed a bored, faintly arrogant air and held his head high as he sauntered past the guard. The guard didn’t give him a second look.

Kayin was waiting for him outside the palace compound’s east gate, halfway between the Crow and the Raven wings. Kayin would not risk his god’s displeasure by visiting the Crow wing of the palace, though Anari had visited the Raven royal household many times. House Crow’s split from House Raven had caused bad blood between Lord Crow and Lord Raven. To the gods, that blood was still fresh, even though four human generations had passed.

After they exchanged greetings, Kayin asked, “You’re certain you want to have a practice bout with me? You’re not up to my weight and you never will be. I was your size when I was thirteen.”

“I’m ready,” Anari insisted. “I’ve been learning.”

Kayin shrugged. “I’m sure you’re good—for a sixteen-year-old Crow.”

“I’m ready,” Anari repeated.

“To first blood?”

“These are practice swords.”

“It happens. To first blood or to a strike that would disable in a real fight, then?”

Continue reading excerpt.

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REVIEWS

"A quick, light fantasy read" - Goodreads review

"I LOVED THIS BOOK!!!" - Goodreads review
"There is a splendor and breadth to the background of the world
we're introduced to that reminded me of the recent Black Panther movie." - Goodreads review

"I would recommend this novel to all high fantasy fans out there." - Goodreads review
"My heart was beating hard in my chest and I had tears in my eyes." - Goodreads review

"A welcome respite from the twelve million high fantasies out there that draw off medieval Europe." - Goodreads review
"A nice blend of action and suspense." - Goodreads review


WHAT ELSE TO READ
(BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS)

If you liked the African and Indian influences in The Unkindness of Ravens, you might also enjoy these fantasy works by other authors.

(See the list of Africa-Influenced Epic Fantasy on Goodreads!)

The City of Brass by S.A. Chakraborty
Afromyth: A Fantasy Collection, ed. J.S. Emuakpor
Fiyah is a magazine of black speculative fiction, which includes African-influenced epic fantasy.
Not So Stories, ed. David Thomas Moore
A Stranger in Olondria by Sofia Samatar
Omenana Magazine

If you have a reading suggestion for fantasy with influences from India or one of the African countries, especially epic fantasy by authors from or with a personal connection to those places, please use my contact form to share it so others can find and enjoy it!

P.S. If you also read science fiction, there are some remarkable Afrofuturism authors writing now.